part 2 – 2017

By | January 1st, 2017|everyday things|

2017 gum illustration animation by penelope dullaghan

Life in 2016 felt particularly fragile and unpredictable and frightening. Some people I hold dear struggled greatly, as did so many humans I don’t know personally. But I have hope for the new year. Mostly it’s hope that we have the ability to act with intention and compassion. That we can pause and choose kindness and gratitude over being right or being in control. Hope that we can write our own stories.

Thank you for being with me here in 2016, and for your continued support in 2017! Sending each of you wishes for a beautiful new year.

xoxo

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PinCause – a pin celebrating love for the women’s march

By | December 29th, 2016|everyday things|

PinCause - illustration love - penelope dullaghan

Friends, I am SO excited to tell you about my collaboration with PinCause! In support of the Women’s March on Washington coming up on January 21st, we created a special pin to publicly stand for Women’s Rights in a positive way. The image is the ASL symbol for love painted in lots of colors, representing unity, compassion, and hope that can bring together women, and ALL people, all over the country.

The pins are $5 each, and with every purchase $1 goes to Planned Parenthood and $1 to the ACLU. After you get one, take a selfie and use tag #PincauseLOVE to join us!

https://pincause.com/

Please share to help spread the word!

PinCause - illustration love - penelope dullaghan

PinCause - illustration love - penelope dullaghan

Squam Art Workshops – Fall 2017

By | December 22nd, 2016|everyday things|

squam art workshop - pattern play linocut, penelope dullaghan

I am so very pleased to announce that I will be teaching at Squam Art Workshops in September of 2017. I’ll be teaching a printmaking class created to introduce you to hand-made surface design. We’ll be exploring the process of making our own linoleum block prints. I hope some of you will be able to join me in beautiful New Hampshire!

Learn more about the class here: http://www.squamartworkshops.com/session/f2017pp/

xo

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block printed gift tags – printable download for you!

By | December 19th, 2016|everyday things|

My favorite way to wrap presents is with handmade wrapping paper. I love the look of handmade, simple gifts.

The easiest (and most inexpensive) way I’ve found to make my own paper is to go to Lowes or any hardware store and buy a large roll of brown or green kraft paper, and then use a white colored pencil or china marker to draw on it – snowflakes, wavy lines or anything really. You can also use a pencil eraser dipped in white ink to make little polka dots (see photo below). Then I tie up the packages with striped bakers string or a thick colorful yarn.

For gift tags this year, I used linocut stamps I made, dipped in silky black ink. I love how simple and graphic they came out. And I thought you might like them too. So I’m offering them as a free download for you to print. They look best on card stock – bright white or any color that matches your wrapping.

I hope you’ll like them!

xo,
penelope

gift tags - free printable from illustrator Penelope Dullaghan

gift tags - free printable from illustrator Penelope Dullaghan

Click on the tags image below to open it in a new window and save it (or drag and drop) to your desktop:

block print gift tags - free printable from illustrator Penelope Dullaghan

 

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Young Activists – portrait of Malala Yousafzai

By | December 15th, 2016|everyday things|

a children's book project on young education activists from around the world, portraits, illustration by penelope dullaghan

Last portrait of the young activist illustration series – Malala Yousafzai. She’s probably the most well-known of the activists I drew. Malala is recognized mainly for women and children’s rights advocacy for education in her native Pakistan, where the local Taliban had banned girls from attending school.

Despite violence, terrorism and threats, Malala was outspoken about education rights for girls: “How dare the Taliban take away my basic right to education?”

On the afternoon of October 9th 2012, Malala boarded her school bus. A Taliban gunman also boarded the bus, shouting “Which one of you is Malala? Speak up, otherwise I will shoot you all”. Upon seeing her, he pointed a pistol at her and fired three shots. One bullet hit the left side of Malala’s forehead, travelled under her skin through the length of her face, and went into her shoulder.

The assassination attempt sparked a national and international outpouring of support for Malala.

In 2014, Malala was announced as the co-recipient of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize for her struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education. At the tender age of 17, Malala became the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate.

Malala continues her work today calling on world leaders to invest in “books, not bullets”.

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Thank you for reading this series. I hope the stories of these young activists have inspired you, perhaps got you thinking, and maybe even encouraged you to be an activist in your own small community. Please feel free to share. Thanks again, friends!

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Young Activists – portrait of Iqbal Masih

By | December 14th, 2016|everyday things|

a children's book project on young education activists from around the world, portraits, illustration by penelope dullaghan

For day 3 of these young activists illustrations, meet Iqbal Masih. He was a small Pakistani boy, who, at age 4, was sold into bondage by his family. Iqbal’s family had borrowed 600 rupees (less than $6.00) from a local employer who owned a carpet weaving factory. In return, their son was required to work as a carpet weaver until the debt was paid off. Every day, Iqbal would rise before dawn and go to the factory, where he and the other children were tightly bound with chains to prevent escape. He would work 12 hours a day, seven days a week, with only a 30-minute break, paid 3 cents a day toward the loan.

At the age of 10, Iqbal escaped his slavery, but was soon caught by police brought back to the factory, who said they would tie him upside down if he tried to escape again. But Iqbal escaped a second time and he attended the Bonded Labour Liberation Front School for former child slaves and quickly completed a four-year education in only two years.

Iqbal helped over 3,000 Pakistani children that were in bonded labor to escape to freedom. He made speeches about child labour throughout the world, encouraging others to join the fight to eradicate child slavery.

Iqbal was fatally shot in Pakistan in April of 1995. He was 12 years old at the time. It’s unknown if he was murdered murdered because of his influence over bonded labor. His funeral was attended by approximately 800 mourners. “The Little Hero: One Boy’s Fight for Freedom” tells the story of his legacy.

* * *

Thank you for reading these rather long post and for your encouragement in sharing these young activist’s stories. The final portrait and post in this series will be coming tomorrow.

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Young Activists – portrait of William Kamkwamba

By | December 13th, 2016|everyday things|

a children's book project on young education activists from around the world, portraits, illustration by penelope dullaghan

Thank you for all the kind comments on yesterday’s young activist portrait! For Day 2, this portrait is of William Kamkwamba. William was born in a family of relative poverty and relied primarily on farming to survive. A crippling famine forced William to drop out of school, and he was not able to return to school because his family was unable to afford the tuition fee. In a desperate attempt to retain his education, William began to frequently visit the school library. It was there that he discovered the book “Using Energy” in which he found rough plans on how to create a makeshift wind turbine.

When he was just 14, he built an electricity-producing windmill from spare parts and scrap, modifying them to fit his needs. The windmill he built powers four lights and two radios in his family home.

His dream was to build a larger windmill to help with irrigation for his entire village, and to go back to school. And in 2014, Kamkwamba received his bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire where he was a student and elected to the Sphinx Senior Honor Society. He is now working with WiderNet to develop appropriate technology curriculum that will allow people to bridge the gap between “knowing” and “doing”.

Find out more about William at: williamkamkwamba.com

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Young Activists – portrait of Mazoun Almellehan

By | December 12th, 2016|everyday things|

a children's book project on young education activists from around the world, portraits, illustration by penelope dullaghan

In the next 3 days I’d like to show you some illustrations I did this past year for a children’s book project about inspiring young activists from around the world. Sadly, the project was unfinished, but it was to feature the stories of the activists along with their portraits and a spot illustration. I’m bummed the project didn’t come to fruition, but I think the work is worth sharing. I hope you’ll be inspired by it!

This first portrait is of Mazoun Almellehan. She is a Syrian refugee who worked hard to make sure girls in Jordan’s refugee camps got an education. For two years she went going door to door in the camps, waging a one-girl campaign to convince parents to keep their daughters in school instead of pressuring them into wedlock.

“Education is very important because it’s the shield we can use to protect ourselves in life. It’s our method to solve our problems,” she says. “If we don’t have education, we can’t defend ourselves.”

More to come tomorrow…

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